Please Lord….Kum-Ba-Ya

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Your picturing it aren’t you? 🙂  The youthful you, at Camp Whatchahitchie sitting around the warm campfire with all your other friends and the guitar gets brought out.  The smiles begin to glow and you begin holding each others hands as the forever familiar song begins to play….

Kumbaya my Lord, kumbaya
Kumbaya my Lord, kumbaya
Kumbaya my Lord, kumbaya
Oh Lord, kumbaya

Forever burned into our hearts and forever at the tip of our tongues when a now silly tune comes to mind.  Society now embraces this song as one again to make light or fun of;  but do we even remember or know what we are making fun of?  What we are making light of in the eyes of our Savior?

Origin:

“Kumbaya, my Lord” was first recorded by an out-of-work English professor, Robert Winslow Gordon, in 1927. Gordon went on a search for black spirituals and recorded a song “Come by Here, My Lord”, sung by H. Wylie. The song was sung in Gullah on the islands of South Carolina between Charleston and Beaufort. Gullah is the creole language featured in the Uncle Remus series of Joel Chandler Harris and the Walt Disney production of Song of the South. “Come by here, my Lord” in Gullah is “Kum by (h)yuh, my lawd” (see our Gullah dictionary).
American missionaries took the song to Angola after its publication in the 1930s, where its origins were forgotten. In the late 1950s the song was rediscovered in Angola and returned to North American where it swept the campfire circuit as a beautiful and mysterious religious lyric. That is why the song is associated with Angola in many current printed versions.
In the US, however, the song was associated with Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, and other campers sitting around a campfire in perfect harmony. The picture of a warm, cozy community without conflict associated itself with the song and especially that foreign-sounding word in its title, kumbaya. Since the word had no actual meaning in English, cynics eventually converted this harmless connotation into the actual English definition of the word. That definition now seems to be “naive, unrealistic optimism” to many of us (not me).

Credit:  http://www.alphadictionary.com/articles/english_grammar_style/kumbaya.html

It’s rather sad isn’t it?  A song originally written to be a cry out to God now is more ridiculed and as mentioned, “unrealistic”.  Lets think about it….how do you soulfully cry out for God?  How can you show God sincerity in our needs?  Right now,  more than ever we need to ask God to kumbaya!

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Worship is taken for granted now-a-days and just this song alone can be so powerful if we sang it with a servant’s heart.  Father we need you to be near us….to help us as we walk through this world and it’s troubles. In honor of this song I bring to you this prayer as a cry of my heart….

My previous Father in heaven, I come before you today burdened with the faces of many who are lost and need you.  Who know you, but choose to disown you when it counts.  Your presence is needed and requested Lord….come by here….

Kumbaya my Lord, kumbaya.
Kumbaya my Lord, kumbaya.
Come by here my Lord, come by here.
Oh Lord, Come by here.

We invite you into our home Lord, please make your presence felt daily when our tired minds set in and our patience is out.  We need you Father to remind us of the foundation of love when the world sends in sin’s termites….

Someone’s singing Lord, kumbaya
Someone’s singing Lord, kumbaya
Someone’s singing Lord, kumbaya
Oh Lord, kumbayah

May our lips forever sing you praises and our words reflect our love for you to others.  Our hearts overflow with joyous sounds of redemption and grace!  Thank you Father!  THANK YOU!!!

Someone’s laughing, Lord, kumbaya
Someone’s laughing, Lord, kumbaya
Someone’s laughing, Lord, kumbaya
Oh Lord, kumbaya

We joyfully ask you to join in our fun Father!  We laugh, not sarcastically at another’s expense, but for the relief we have for all eternity because of your son Jesus Christ!   May this expression of gratitude never leave our souls!

Someone’s crying, Lord, kumbaya
Someone’s crying, Lord, kumbaya
Someone’s crying, Lord, kumbaya
Oh Lord, kumbaya

Oh our Father, even as our lips are in praise and our souls overjoyed by your love; we know there is a world that is still in pain.  There are so many of our loved ones who don’t know this joy or peace and they shed tears of desparation and fear.  Our Father, may we comfort those who need you; may we embrace those in pain and need your love; may we love those with your love and not our own to bring them an everlasting hope.  Gracious Lord, may we be your hands and feet, give your heart and not our own, and denounce those fears with the cheers of your redeeming grace to those crying out for you!

Someone’s praying, Lord, kumbaya
Someone’s praying, Lord, kumbaya
Someone’s praying, Lord, kumbaya
Oh Lord, kumbaya

Hear the prayers Lord of your people.   Tingle our hearts with your Holy Spirit’s presence.  Draw us dear Father, closer to you as we conversate with you.  We love you Abba….

Someone’s sleeping, Lord, kumbaya
Someone’s sleeping, Lord, kumbaya
Someone’s sleeping, Lord, kumbaya
Oh Lord, kumbaya
Oh Lord, kumbaya

As we lay our heads down each night Father God, bring our souls rest and our temples healing so that each day when we rise another day we embrace the gift of that moment. May our dreams be of heaven and the room you’ve prepared for us; as our rest is in your arms each night dear Father, your children are at home….

Come by here my Lord, come by here…..

In Jesus name…..AMEN.

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